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Category Archive CentOS6.4

“Device eth0 does not seem to be present” error when we move or clone a CentOS 6.3 virtual machine in vSphere

May 11, 2014 Comments Off on “Device eth0 does not seem to be present” error when we move or clone a CentOS 6.3 virtual machine in vSphere By MANOJ AGARWAL

When we move or clone a CentOS 6.3 Virtual machine made in vSphere5.5, and boot the machine once it is moved/cloned, we get the following error:

“Device eth0 does not seem to be present”.

This is due the fact that whenever we move or clone a Virtual machine, vSphere changes the MAC Address and CentOS renames the NIC from eth0 to eth1.  CentOS stores the network interface hardware configuration using udev.  The file is:

/etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules

Open this file in vi editor and delete the old entry for eth0 and edit the new entry for eth1 to eth0.

Then you need to edit the following file:

/etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0

Record the HWADDR from the 70-persistent-net.rules configuration file and replace it with the existing HWADDR in ifcfg-eth0 configuration file.

Reboot the machine.

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List only directories in Linux

April 25, 2014 Comments Off on List only directories in Linux By MANOJ AGARWAL

How to List only directories in Linux

ls command is used in linux to list the files in current directory or the specified directory.  However it doesn’t list the directories only in the given directory.  We can use ls with the combination of grep command to list only directories in a given directory.  ll is the short form of long listing of directory and is used to show detailed listing of files and directories in the current/specified directory.  It can also be used with grep command to list only directories.

Type the following command:

ls -l | grep ^d

Another form of this command is:

ll | grep ^d

We can also use the following command to list only directories:

ls -d */

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How to clean yum cache

April 25, 2014 Comments Off on How to clean yum cache By MANOJ AGARWAL

How to clean yum cache

YUM stands for Yellowdog Updater Modified and is used to install and maintain packages in Linux.  By default, the packages downloaded with yum are kept in cache.  If we need to clean these, the following options are available:

yum clean packages
yum clean headers
yum clean all

yum clean packages will clean all packages from the cache in linux.

yum clean headers will clean all header files that are required to check the availability of packages.  If we clean the headers, then next time, it does a fresh download if it is needed again.

yum clean all will clear the headers as well as packages from the cache.

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Add swap file in CentOS 6.4

July 17, 2013 Comments Off on Add swap file in CentOS 6.4 By MANOJ AGARWAL

Add swap file in CentOS 6.4

Swapon command with option -s, displays the current swap space in KB.

# swapon -s
If a file with the name /extraswap already exists, check it with ‘ls’ command and delete it using ‘rm’ command.
#  ls /extraswap
#  rm -rf /extraswap

The following dd command example creates a swap file with the name “extraswap” under / directory with a size of 1024MB (1GB).

# dd if=/dev/zero of=/extraswap bs=1M count=1024

Change the permission of the swap file so that only root can access it.

# chmod 600 /extraswap

Make this file as a swap file using mkswap command.

# mkswap /extraswap

Enable the newly created swapfile.

# swapon /extraswap

To make this swap file available as a swap area even after the reboot, add the following line to the /etc/fstab file.

/extraswap swap swap defaults 0 0

Verify whether the newly created swap area is available for your use.

# swapon -s  

Install Apache 2.4.4 in CentOS 6.4

May 28, 2013 Comments Off on Install Apache 2.4.4 in CentOS 6.4 By MANOJ AGARWAL


Install Apache 2.4.4 in CentOS 6.4

Apache HTTP server is an open source and most popular web server for Linux distributions as well as for Windows.
The website is: http://httpd.apache.org/

CentOS 6.4 comes with Apache version 2.2.15-28.  To install Apache 2.2.15 in CentOS 6.4, we use yum as follows:

# yum install httpd

But, if we wish to install the latest version of Apache HTTP server, that is v2.4.4 in CentOS 6.4, we need to run the following commands:

# cd /usr/local/src
# yum -y install wget

# wget http://pkgs.fedoraproject.org/repo/pkgs/apr/apr-1.4.6.tar.bz2/ffee70a111fd07372982b0550bbb14b7/apr-1.4.6.tar.bz2

# wget http://pkgs.fedoraproject.org/repo/pkgs/apr-util/apr-util-1.5.2.tar.bz2/89c1348aa79e898d7c34a6206311c9c2/apr-util-1.5.2.tar.bz2

# wget http://pkgs.fedoraproject.org/repo/pkgs/httpd/httpd-2.4.4.tar.bz2/0e712ee2119cd798c8ae39d5f11a9206/httpd-2.4.4.tar.bz2

# wget http://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/fedora/linux/releases/18/Fedora/source/SRPMS/d/distcache-1.4.5-23.src.rpm

# yum -y install autoconf libtool doxygen expat expat-devel libuuid-devel db4-devel mysql-devel unixODBC-devel postgresql-devel sqlite-devel pcre pcre-devel lua-devel libxml2-devel openldap-devel nss-devel

# wget http://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/6/x86_64/epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm

# rpm -ivh epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm
# yum -y install freetds freetds-devel
# yum -y install glib
# cd /usr/local/src
# yum -y install rpm-build

# rpmbuild -tb /usr/local/src/apr-1.4.6.tar.bz2
# rpm -ivh –aid /root/rpmbuild/RPMS/i686/apr-1.4.6-1.i686.rpm
# rpm -ivh –aid /root/rpmbuild/RPMS/i686/apr-devel-1.4.6-1.i686.rpm

# rpmbuild -tb /usr/local/src/apr-util-1.5.2.tar.bz2
# rpm -ivh –aid /root/rpmbuild/RPMS/i686/apr-util-1.5.2-1.i686.rpm
# rpm -ivh –aid /root/rpmbuild/RPMS/i686/apr-util-devel-1.5.2-1.i686.rpm
# rpm -ivh –aid /root/rpmbuild/RPMS/i686/apr-util-dbm-1.5.2-1.i686.rpm
# rpm -ivh –aid /root/rpmbuild/RPMS/i686/apr-util-debuginfo-1.5.2-1.i686.rpm
# rpm -ivh –aid /root/rpmbuild/RPMS/i686/apr-util-freetds-1.5.2-1.i686.rpm
# rpm -ivh –aid /root/rpmbuild/RPMS/i686/apr-util-ldap-1.5.2-1.i686.rpm
# rpm -ivh –aid /root/rpmbuild/RPMS/i686/apr-util-mysql-1.5.2-1.i686.rpm
# rpm -ivh –aid /root/rpmbuild/RPMS/i686/apr-util-nss-1.5.2-1.i686.rpm
# rpm -ivh –aid /root/rpmbuild/RPMS/i686/apr-util-odbc-1.5.2-1.i686.rpm
# rpm -ivh –aid /root/rpmbuild/RPMS/i686/apr-util-openssl-1.5.2-1.i686.rpm
# rpm -ivh –aid /root/rpmbuild/RPMS/i686/apr-util-pgsql-1.5.2-1.i686.rpm
# rpm -ivh –aid /root/rpmbuild/RPMS/i686/apr-util-sqlite-1.5.2-1.i686.rpm

# rpmbuild –rebuild distcache-1.4.5-23.src.rpm
# rpm -ivh –aid /root/rpmbuild/RPMS/i686/distcache-1.4.5-23.i686.rpm
# rpm -ivh –aid /root/rpmbuild/RPMS/i686/distcache-devel-1.4.5-23.i686.rpm

# rpmbuild -tb /usr/local/src/httpd-2.4.4.tar.bz2

# rpm -ivh –aid /root/rpmbuild/RPMS/i686/httpd-2.4.4-1.i686.rpm
# rpm -ivh –aid /root/rpmbuild/RPMS/i686/httpd-debuginfo-2.4.4-1.i686.rpm
# rpm -ivh –aid /root/rpmbuild/RPMS/i686/httpd-manual-2.4.4-1.i686.rpm
# rpm -ivh –aid /root/rpmbuild/RPMS/i686/httpd-tools-2.4.4-1.i686.rpm
# rpm -ivh –aid /root/rpmbuild/RPMS/i686/mod_authnz_ldap-2.4.4-1.i686.rpm
# rpm -ivh –aid /root/rpmbuild/RPMS/i686/mod_lua-2.4.4-1.i686.rpm
# rpm -ivh –aid /root/rpmbuild/RPMS/i686/mod_proxy_html-2.4.4-1.i686.rpm
# rpm -ivh –aid /root/rpmbuild/RPMS/i686/mod_socache_dc-2.4.4-1.i686.rpm
# rpm -ivh –aid /root/rpmbuild/RPMS/i686/mod_ssl-2.4.4-1.i686.rpm

# service httpd restart

# service httpd status

# apachectl -v

# chkconfig httpd on


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Install apache 2.2.15 in CentOS 6.4

May 24, 2013 Comments Off on Install apache 2.2.15 in CentOS 6.4 By MANOJ AGARWAL

Install apache 2.2.15 in CentOS 6.4

Apache HTTP server is an open source and most popular web server for Linux distributions as well as for Windows. The website is: http://httpd.apache.org/

CentOS 6.4 comes with Apache version 2.2.15-28.  To install Apache 2.2.15 in CentOS 6.4, we need to do the following:

If yum repository is configured correctly in CentOS, we can use yum command to install httpd, as shown in Figure-1

                                                          [Figure-1]

yum lists all dependencies required to install httpd and lists them as shown in Figure-2.  Press ‘y’ to confirm installing ‘httpd’, along with all its required dependecies.

                                                         [Figure-2]

Once httpd is installed, we get the message that httpd installation along with all of its dependencies is complete as shown in Figure-3.

                                                         [Figure-3]

Restart httpd service using the command, ‘service httpd restart’.  If httpd is started successfully, we see [ OK ] message as shown in Figure-4.

                                                        [Figure-4]

To configure apache settings, we need to make changes in apache configuration file, that is located in ‘/etc/httpd/conf’ directory by the name ‘httpd.conf’ as shown in Figure-5.

                                                        [Figure-5]

Logs from apache are stored in the location ‘/var/log/httpd’.  Two basic log files are frequently used to analyze the activity of Web-server, these are ‘access_log’ and ‘error_log’.  To view these files, use vi editor/tail command/cat command etc. as shown in Figure-6 and 7.


                                                       [Figure-6]

                                                       [Figure-7]

To start apache server at start-up, use the following command:
chkconfig httpd on

To test if apache is running and configured correctly, type this url: ‘http://localhost’ in the browser, and see that apache test page is displayed.

 

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Install Postgresql 9.2.4 in CentOS 6.4

May 23, 2013 Comments Off on Install Postgresql 9.2.4 in CentOS 6.4 By MANOJ AGARWAL

How to install Postgresql 9.2.4 in CentOS 6.4

PostgreSQL is an open source object relational database system.  It comes pre-bundled with CentOS 6.4, the version of Postgres that is bundled with CentOS 6.4 is 8.4.13.  The latest version of Postgres available as on today is 9.2.4.  If we wish to install this latest version in CentOS 6.4, we have to follow the following steps:

Step 1: Download PostgreSQL v9.2.4 from postgres website by clicking on Download button, given below:

DOWNLOAD PostgreSQl – v9.2.4
[postgresql-9.2.4.tar.gz]
 

Step 2: Copy this file in /usr/local/src

Step 3: Change directory to /usr/local/src, as shown in Figure-1.

                                                          [Figure-1]

Step 4: Unzip the contents of tar using ‘tar -xvzf postgresql-9.2.4.tar.gz’ command as shown in Figure-2.

                                                          [Figure-2]

Step 5: Change directory to postgresql-9.2.4, as shown in Figure-3.

                                                          [Figure-3]

Step 6: Start the installation of Postgres by typing the command: ‘./configure –without-readline –without-zlib’, as shown in Figure-4. 

                                                          [Figure-4]

Step 7: Run command ‘gmake’ as shown in Figure-5.

                                                          [Figure-5]

 Step 8: Run command ‘gmake install’ as shown in Figure-6.

                                                          [Figure-6]

Step 9: Add user ‘postgres’ in CentOS using adduser command and set a password for this user using ‘passwd postgres’ command as shown in Figure-7.

                                                          [Figure-7]

Step 10: Make a new directory for PGDATA, as ‘/var/ lib/pgsql/data’ as shown in Figure-8.

                                                          [Figure-8]

Step 11: Change ownership of this newly created directory ‘/var/lib/pgsql/data’ as postgres.postgres.

                                                          [Figure-9]

Step 12: Switch to non-root user ‘postgres’ using ‘su’ command.  Once logged in as ‘postgres’, run the following command to initialize the database:

/usr/local/pgsql/bin/initdb -D /var/lib/pgsql/data

                                                          [Figure-10]

Step 13: Once database is initialized, we can run the postgres server using the following command:
/usr/local/pgsql/bin/postgres -D /var/lib/pgsql/data > pg_log 2>&1 &

                                                          [Figure-11]

Step 14: Create a database named ‘tests’ and use this database using the following commands as shown in Figure-12.

                                                          [Figure-12]

Step 15: Exit from psql prompt using ‘\q’, exit from ‘postgres’ user shell and open ‘pg_hba.conf’ file inside ‘/var/lib/pgsql/data’ as shown in Figure-13.

                                                          [Figure-13]

 Step 16: Now we need to set up start script for starting PostgreSQL like other services in CentOS.  There is a default start-script named ‘linux’ in this location:
‘/usr/local/src/postgresql-9.2.4/contrib/start-scripts/’

                                                          [Figure-14]

Step 17: Copy this start-script for PostgreSQL in ‘/etc/init.d/’ directory by the name ‘postgresql’ as shown in Figure-15.

                                                          [Figure-15]

Step 18: We can change configuration settings in this start-up script.  To change the settings, open ‘/etc/init.d/postgresql’ in ‘vi’ editor.

                                                          [Figure-16]

Step 19: One thing we need to change in postgresql start-up script is PGDATA location to ‘/var/lib/pgsql/data’ as shown in Figure-17.

                                                          [Figure-17]

Step 20: Grant execute permission to this start-up script using ‘chmod’ as shown in Figure-18.

                                                          [Figure-18]

Step 21: Now we can start, stop, restart or see status of postgresql service using following commands:

# service postgresql start
# service postgresql restart
# service postgresql status
# service postgresql stop

Use ‘chkconfig’ command to start PostgreSQL service at startup of CentOS as shown in Figure-19

                                                          [Figure-19]

Reboot CentOS and see using ‘service postgresql status’ command, if this service starts automatically at startup.

So, we have installed PostgreSQL 9.2.4 in CentOS 6.4.

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Installation of CentOS 6.4 in VMWare Workstation 9.0.2

May 16, 2013 Comments Off on Installation of CentOS 6.4 in VMWare Workstation 9.0.2 By MANOJ AGARWAL


Installation of CentOS 6.4 in VMWare Workstation 9.0.2

We have seen in our previous post how to Create a CentOS 6.4 Virtual machine in VMWare Workstation 9.0.2. Now we will look into the installation steps of CentOS 6.4 operating system inside VMWare Workstation.

In Virtual machine ‘Edit settings’ option, chose CD/DVD option to select the installation Disk/ISO images from CentOS.  Remember to check the option ‘Connect at power on’, so that the CD/DVD/ISO is connected to the machine when we boot it.  When we start the Virtual machine, we get the Figure-1 as shown below.  Select ‘Install or upgrade an existing system’ to do a fresh installation of Centos 6.4.

                                                                   [Figure-1]

In the next step, it asks to do a media test before beginning the installation.  We may chose to go for a media test to verify the installation Disk/ISO image, or we may skip this test.  Select ‘Skip’ as shown in figure-2.

                                                                   [Figure-2]

In the next figurre, it displays the logo of CentOS 6, as shown in figure-3.

                                                                   [Figure-3]

In the next step, we need to chose the language that we would like to use during the installation process.  The default selection is Engish (English).  If we need to select any different language, we may do the selection from the given list, else we may leave the default language and clieck Next as shown in figure-4.

                                                                   [Figure-4]

We have to now select the appropriate keyboard based on regional settings.  The keyboard, by default, is shown as U.S. English.  If we prefer ‘United Kingdom’, we may chose that or any other option from the given list, based on our keyboard.  We may leave the default selection as ‘U.S. English’ for now and click ‘Next’ as shown in figure-5.

                                                                   [Figure-5]

In the next step, we need to specify the storage device for this installation.  We may chose ‘Basic Storage Device’, that is by default, or we may chose ‘Specialized Storage Devices’ for SAN storage or other such specialized storage.  Chose the default option and click on ‘Next’ as shown in figure-6.

                                                                   [Figure-6]

Next, we get a warning for Storage Device, that it may contain data, we may chose to ‘Discard any data’ that is  in it, or we may chose to keep the data, if we think, the virtual disk contains some data.  In this case, it is a new virtual disk, so we may chose ‘Yes, discard any data’, also we need to check the option ‘Apply my choice to all devices with undetected partitions or filesystems’ to make it applicable as shown in figure-7.

                                                                   [Figure-7]

Specify the hostname for this machine.  We may chose any hostname, for this installation, we may use ‘centos64’ as the hostname as shown in figure-8.  We may also use a fully qualified domain name as hostname.  We may Configure network at this stage or leave it for now, as we can do it later once installation is done.  Click on ‘Next’ to continue.

                                                                   [Figure-8]

Next, we need to select the timezone, we may chose the appropriate timezone, in this case, ‘Asis/Kolkata’ as shown in figure-9 and click on ‘Next’ to continue.

                                                                   [Figure-9]

We need to give a password for ‘root’ account.  ‘root’ account is the administrator account in CentOS.  Try to give a strong password and click on ‘Next’ to continue as shown in figure-10.

                                                                   [Figure-10]

The next screen provides the options to use disk space.  We may chose to ‘Use all space’, which means that all partitions will be removed and the complete disk will be available for use.  We may also chose to replace only the linux system, and leave other partitions such as VFAT or FAT32 as such.  We may chose to ‘Shrink current system’ to make room for new installation.  We may chose not to touch the existing partitioning layout and use only the free space for new installation.  We may also chose to create a custom layout as per our requirement.  As it is a new virtual disk, click on ‘Use all space’ as shown in figure-11 and click ‘Next’ to continue.

                                                                   [Figure-11]

Next step is to create a partitioning layout for this new installation.  We may chose to create a Volume Group and Logical Volumes inside this Volume Group.  We have taken a virtual disk size of 100GB, so we can allocate this size among various Physical partitions, Volume Groups and Logical Volumes.  The next screen ‘Please select a Device’ as shown in figure-12 is used for this.

                                                                   [Figure-12]

To take an example, we may define the following partitioning layout:

Filesystem Mounted on Size
 /dev/sda1 /boot 500mb
 vg_centos64 100000mb
   lv_var /var  20000mb
   lv_htdocs /htdocs  35000mb
   lv_root /  10000mb
   lv_home /home  3000mb
   lv_tmp /tmp  3000mb
   lv_mondo /mondo  10000mb

                                                                  [Table-1]

After creating the structure as per Table-1, we get the figure-13 as shown below:

                                                                   [Figure-13]

Clicking on Next button shows the figure-14, that gives Format warnings that /dev/sda will be formatted and all data inside it will be destroyed.  Click on Format to continue.

                                                                   [Figure-14]

The next screen Figure-15 shows the warning about Writing storage configuration to disk. It displays a message that the partitioning options will be written to disk and data on it will be lost.  Click on ‘Write changes to disk’ button.

                                                                   [Figure-15]

The  next figure-16 shows that the formatting is being done on the disk.

                                                                   [Figure-16]

The next figure-17 shows the options to set Boot loader operating system, It will be installed on /dev/sda and on vg_centos64-lv_root.  We also get an option to define a boot loader password, if required.  Click on ‘Next’ to continue.

                                                                   [Figure-17]

On clicking ‘Next’ button, it starts to process the installation and tries to retrieve the installation information for CentOS as shown in figure-18.

                                                                   [Figure-18]

This step is important as we can define in this step what to install.  The default installation is Minimal install.  We may chose other options such as Basic server, Database server, Web server etc. based on our requirement.  Chosing these options decide what packages will be installed and what not.  We can also do a Customized installation, now or later, where we may chose what packages should be installed from the list.  We may chose Minimal install option for our example case and click on ‘Next’ as shown in figure-19.

                                                                   [Figure-19]

When we click on ‘Next’ button, we see the message ‘Installation starting’ and the installation process starts for minimal installation of CentOS as shown in figure-20.

                                                                   [Figure-20]

After the installation is finished, we get the following screen as shown in figure-21, that your CentOS installation is complete.  Click on ‘Reboot’ to restart the virtual machine.

                                                                   [Figure-21]

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CentOS 6.4 Virtual Machine installation in VMWare Workstation 9.0.2

May 13, 2013 Comments Off on CentOS 6.4 Virtual Machine installation in VMWare Workstation 9.0.2 By MANOJ AGARWAL


CentOS 6.4 Virtual Machine in VMWare Workstation 9.0.2

To create a Centos 6.4 Virtual Machine in VMWare Workstation 9.0.2, we need to follow the steps given below:

  • Open VMWare Workstation 9.0.2.
  • From File->New Virtual Machine.  The following figure-1 is displayed.

                                              [Figure-1]

In Hardware compatibility, chose compatibility for Workstation 6.5-7.x, to make this virtual machine compatible with these former versions of VMWare Workstation as shown in Figure-2.  You have other options also for backward compatibility.

                                              [Figure-2]

In Figure-3, you need to specify how you will install the guest operating system, either from installer disc or ISO images or you will install it later.  If you wish to do an easy install of Centos 6.4, you should select either the disc or ISO image.  If you wish to do a selective Centos 6.4 installation, chose the third option – ‘I will install the operating system later’, as shown in Figure-3.

                                              [Figure-3]

In Figure-4, you need to select the guest operating system, in this case, it is Centos 6.4, chose Linux and in Version, chose Centos, as shown below.

                                              [Figure-4]

In Figure-5, you need to name the Virtual machine, provide name of the Virtual machine as CentOS and specify the location of the Virtual machine, either by writing it in the textbox or selecting it by clicking Browse button.

                                              [Figure-5]

In Figure-6, you need to chose the number of processors and cores that will be allocated to this Virtual machine.  This option is valid, if you have multiple processors with multiple cores per processor.  In this case there is one processor with one core for that processor.

                                              [Figure-6]

In Figure-7, you need to specify the amount of virtual memory to be allocated to this Virtual machine.  You will see Guest OS recommended minimum memory, Recommended memory and Maximum recommended memory. It is good to chose Recommended memory as shown below.

                                              [Figure-7]

In Figure-8, you need to chose the network type, that can be either Bridged, NAT or Host only.  In this case, you may chose ‘Bridged’ network to provide guest operating system direct access to the external network.  You will need to configure the IP address of this guest machine later.

                                              [Figure-8]

In Figure-9, you need to chose the SCSI controller, chose LSI logic, that is the recommended option for this.

                                              [Figure-9]

In Figure-10, you need to chose the Disk to be associated with this Virtual machine.  You may chose to create a new virtual disk, or use an existing virtual disk, if you already have one.  You also have the option to use a physical disk.  In this case, you may chose to create a new virtual disk and click on next button.

                                              [Figure-10]

In Figure-11, you have to select the Disk type, chose SCSI that is recommended option as IDE disks are not used anymore.

                                              [Figure-11]

In Figure-12, you need to specify the Disk capacity in GB.  You may chose the maximum disk size.  You have  the option to allocate all chosen disk space in advance, or you may leave it to expand when needed.  Also, you may chose to create only one virtual disk, or you may split it into multiple files for easy handling.

                                              [Figure-12]

In Figure-13, you need to specify a name for the Disk file.  You may name it as CentOS.vmdk, where vmdk is the file extension of a Disk file.

                                              [Figure-13]

In Figure-14, you get a final message, showing your selected settings with a message ‘Ready to create Virtual machine’.  Click on Finish and the Virtual machine will be created.

                                              [Figure-14]

 Once the Virtual machine is created, you can install Centos 6.4 operating system.  To know about this installation, you may visit:

Installing Centos 6.4 as a Guest operating system in VMWare Workstation 9.0.2

 

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Disable Easy install of CentOS 6.4 in VMWare Workstation 7.1.3

May 9, 2013 Comments Off on Disable Easy install of CentOS 6.4 in VMWare Workstation 7.1.3 By MANOJ AGARWAL


Disable Easy install of CentOS 6.4 in VMWare Workstation 7.1.3

VMWare Workstation is used for Desktop Virtualization.  When we create a new CentOS 6.4 guest machine insdie it, among other screens, we get the following screen shown in Fig-1, to select the installer disc.

                                              Fig-1

If we select the installer disc, either from DVD or an ISO image and complete creation of this new CentOS 6.4 virtual machine, This machine starts with an easy install feature and the linux operating system is automatically installed.

To stop ‘EASY INSTALL’ of CentOS 6.4, we need to select the third option ‘I will install the operating system later’ as shown in the following screen shown in Fig-2.

                                                 Fig-2

Once the CentOS 6.4 virtual machine is created, we can start this virtual machine.  Once we start the virtual machine, we get an option to provide the Installer disc/image, wherein we may select the disc/ISO image from CentOS 6.4 and Reboot the virtual machine.

Once rebooted, the EASY INSTALL is gone now and we get the following screen as shown in Fig-3.

                                                                         Fig-3

We can now proceed with the installation of CentOS 6.4.

 

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